Best of both worlds

A trail featuring popular Gardens both indoors & outdoors, including our spectacular cooled Conservatories and the iconic Supertrees. Start off at the Cloud Forest and explore diverse vegetaion and plantlife from the tropical highlands at the 35metre-tall man-made mountain. Discover exotic plants from the dry Mediterranean climate at the Flower Dome. There's also more to see outside where each area is a step into a different landscape.

Are you ready to explore the Gardens?

Distance

2 km

Duration

3 - 4 hours

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Cloud Forest

Cloud Forest is a cooled conservatory, featuring a lush mountain clad with the most exotic plant species from the world over.

Opens daily: 9am - 9pm

From $8 onwards

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Tasmanian Tree Fern (Dicksonia antarctica)

Location: After the Falls

In cloud forests, the tasmanian tree fern can grow up to 15 metres tall, like a medium-sized tree, with a large canopy of arching leaves. In its native Southeastern Australian habitat, it is more likely to reach five metres. It is called a  “tree fern” because of its tree-like “trunk” structure which is not really a trunk. This “trunk” is merely the compacted decaying remains of the plant’s earlier growth. A rich source of nutrients, it is often colonised by other ferns, mosses and orchids.

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Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora)

Location: After the Falls

Magnolias are part of an ancient family of evergreen flowering trees. As they were originally pollinated by beetles before bees existed, their flowers have evolved to be tough enough to withstand being trampled on by big insects. The southern magnolia produces very large, white fragrant flowers above large, glossy and leathery leaves, making it popular as an ornamental tree. Its bright red seeds are food for birds and squirrels while its timber is used for construction of furniture, boxes and doors in the US.

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Begonia (Begonia spp.)

Location: On the mountain wall

Begonias are mostly shade-loving plants that prefer to grow on steep and rocky terrain. There are over 1,700 species and many cultivars and hybrids. Their leaves are mostly asymmetrical and variegated with varying patterns. Their showy flowers bloom in a range of vibrant colours, making them popular as ornamental plants all over the world. However, their numbers in the wild are decreasing, making conservation a concern for the endemic species. A variety of species and cultivars are also on display at the Secret Garden.

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Bromeliads (various genera)

Location: On the mountain wall

Bromeliads live in a wide range of environments from deserts to rainforests, from sea level to 4,200 metres above it, and on trees, rocks or on the ground. In cloud forests, bromeliads mostly grow on trees or rocks, and their roots serve more as a form of attachment rather than for water intake. As such, many have evolved tightly-overlapping leaf bases that form a small vessel for capturing and storing water. Some organisms such as tree frogs make their homes there! Look out for more species and varieties displayed on our Supertrees.

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Wollemi Pine (Wollemia nobilis)

Location: Secret Garden

Wollemi pine, the only known species of the genus Wollemia, was discovered only very recently in 1994, in a remote gorge in New South Wales. Its closest ancestor is presumed to be the fossil genus, Dilwynites, that went extinct millions of years ago. Fewer than a hundred trees, including some 1,000-year-old specimens, have been found in the wild. A propagation programme has made the wollemi pine available to botanical gardens throughout the world to ensure the species remains viable in the long term.

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Secret Life of Trees

At the Secret Life of Trees, discover all about the variety of swaying green giants that thrive in Singapore, and learn about the challenges they face to survive in tropical countries.

Open daily: 5.00am - 2.00am

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Sandbox Tree/ Monkey-No-Climb (Hura crepitans)

In its native tropical habitat, the sandbox tree may grow up to 60 metres tall. It is also called the monkey-no-climb tree for its extremely spiny bark! The worst danger though, might come from its ripened pods which split explosively and catapult its seeds with great force, up to 50 metres away! Its seed pods resemble tangerines made of wood and were once used to hold sand for blotting ink. Its sap is toxic and used by the indigenous people of the Amazon rainforest for their arrows.

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Snowflake Tree (Trevesia burckii)

The snowflake tree grows in the shade of the rainforests of Southeast Asia from Thailand to Borneo. Its bark is green with a spiny texture. Young seedlings have ovate leaves which later become palmate and lobed. On mature trees that can grow up to 10 metres in the wild, a single leaf may look like it is made up of many leaflets radiating from a central point, resembling a snowflake and hence its common name. 

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Pau-mulato/ Naked Tree (Calycophyllum spruceanum)

An Amazon canopy tree, the pau-mulato grows tall and straight and up to 30 metres. Its smooth bark turns from light green to dark brown and sheds and regenerates on a yearly basis, making it a renewable resource. For generations, its bark has been harvested by indigenous Indians for its antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal properties. Even so, the bark is less well-known compared to its high density, durable wood that is logged for construction and parquet.

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World of Palms

Meet a colourful array of tropical lowland palms, each with its unique form, shape and stature at the World of Palms.

Open daily: 5.00am - 2.00am

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Aaneityum Palm (Carpoxylon macrospermum)

First identified in 1859, on the island of Aneityum in the Pacific Archipelago of Vanuatu, this beautiful palm, found nowhere else, had been thought to have gone extinct until it was rediscovered inland in 1987. The Aaneityum palm grows to 18 metres tall and has distinctive, gracefully-arching leaves, with leaflets that tend to stand upright rather than hang down. Its bright-red fruits resemble green coconuts in texture and flavour and are considered a local delicacy. This is an extremely rare plant that needs to be conserved.

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Endau fan palm (Livistona endauensis) 

This rare palm was first discovered in Endau-Rompin, Peninsular Malaysia, where it grows up to 15 metres tall, along ridge tops and steep slopes on shallow soil. Another small population grows in the eastern hills of Terengganu, in the eastern region of the country, giving it a disjunct distribution. It has a slender, smooth trunk with a dense crown of stiff and large, glossy, fan-shaped leaves. Small, golden-yellow flowers are solitary or in clusters of two or three and the bluish-green, pear-shaped fruits wrinkle on drying.

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Seychelles Stilt Palm (Verschaffeltia splendida)

The Seychelles stilt palm can reach 25 metres in height but is usually much shorter. It is endemic to Seychelles, growing in damp forests, on steep hillsides, gorges and ledges. Its stilt roots keep it anchored and supported upright regardless of the terrain. Hard, needle-like spines at the top of its trunk deter hungry animals. Its wood was commonly used as building material but invasive plants have led to a sharp decline in its population over the years. This palm is now vulnerable as it grows nowhere else.

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Floral Fantasy

Floral Fantasy promises an escape that’s truly out of this world. Embark on an enchanting journey through four whimsical gardens enlivened by a creative amalgamation of foliage and flowers. 

Mon - Fri: 10.00am – 7.00pm

Sat, Sun & PH: 10.00am – 8.00pm

From $10 onwards

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Dance

Be sure to pose for a few iconic insta-worthy shots with a rainbow of flowering plants suspended from the ceiling, which move sinuously in mesmerising fashion at Dance. The upside-down tapestry is made up of more than 15,000 blooms of hydrangeas, sago bush, caspias, brunias, statices and delphiniums, just to name a few.

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Float

Take in the calming sounds of water flowing through a landscape planted with temperate trees and shrubs and overhanging fuchsias at Float. Spot the unique three-lobed leaves of formosa sweet gum (Liquidambar formosana), and the pines of Taiwan white pine (Pinus morrisonicola) that come in bundles of five.

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Waltz

Take a stroll down Waltz amidst sheets of falling water, cascading rocks and winding driftwood. This rainforest-inspired landscape is filled with more than 100 species of orchids, pitcher plants and bromeliads. Spot the Poison Dart Frogs on display here; despite being tiny, they are hard to miss because of their brilliant colours.

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Drift 

Enter Drift, a cave-like space that is ringed with terraced rock formations where begonias, huperzias and ferns are planted. The semi-enclosed space is set aglow with soft lighting that mimics the rhythmic fading in and out of glow worms in caves.

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Flower Dome

Catch our changing floral displays and explore nine invigorating gardens featuring flora from the world’s cool-dry regions in the Flower Dome. 

9am - 9pm

From $8 onwards

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Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)

Location: Succulent Garden

The small, yellow flowers on the golden barrel cactus take a long time to appear. In a lifespan of 30 years, this cactus only blooms after 20. It has shallow roots but can grow up to 1.5 metres tall and weigh up to 45 kilograms, with all the precious water it stores in its fleshy, round stem. A dam and reservoir destroyed its native and endemic Mexican range. Endangered in the wild, it is now a popular ornamental plant outside of Mexico.

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Silk Floss Tree/ Drunken Tree/ Palo Borracho (Ceiba chodatii)

Location: The Baobabs

Drought-resistant, the drunken tree is so-named because of its bottle-shaped trunk that bulges from the water it stores for dry spells. Its spanish name, palo borracho literally means “drunken stick”. Trunks of young trees have a green tinge, enabling photosynthesis and are covered with thorns, which recede as trees age and turn grey. They grow oblong seed pods filled with seeds that have white, fluffy, silky fibres that are dispersed by wind, giving it its other common name, silk floss tree.

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Kangaroo Paw (Anigozanthos spp.)

Location: Australian Garden

Kangaroo paw is the common name for a number of closely-related drought-resistant Anigozanthos species. The sap in the root system allows the plant to survive extreme dry spells. Coated with dense hairs, the velvety, tubular flowers open in a claw-like shape which gives it its marsupial name. The kangaroo paw is pollinated by birds that rest on the plant’s long stalks to feed on its nectar. It has become very popular with people too, as potted plants and cut flowers. Anigozanthos manglesii is the floral emblem of Western Australia.

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King Protea (Protea cynaroides)

Location: South African Garden

The national flower of South Africa, king protea is a very popular flowering plant that grows in the Western Cape region of South Africa. It is fire-resistant as it has dormant buds in its underground stems, allowing the shrub to re-sprout after a fire. It is a multi-stemmed, upright shrub that blooms once a year. The flowers are known for having a long vase life and are very popular in floral arrangements. As an added bonus, they can also be dried and even made into tea.

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Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis)

Location: Mediterranean Garden

The canary island date palm boasts a wide stem and a very large, dense crown of arching leaves. The bottom leaves of the crown are pruned to enhance its look, making it resemble a pineapple. This palm can stand 15 to 20 metres tall but will take decades to reach its full height, as it barely grows 15 centimetres a year. Its fruits are edible but not particularly fleshy and tasty, unlike the true date palm, Phoenix dactylifera, which can also be found at the Mediterranean Garden.

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Flower Field

Before you head out, be sure to take lots of memorable shots with the changing thematic display at the Flower Field. It showcases seasonal displays of flowers and shrubs from various regions that bloom at different times of the year.

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Indian Garden

Discover the garden's inspired, vibrant motifs and lush fauna, representing life and aspects of daily Indian culture.

Open daily: 5.00am - 2.00am

Spot It

Banyan Tree (Ficus benghalensis)

The national tree of India, the banyan tree is very large and is able to spread laterally with its supporting aerial roots which anchor its branches to the ground. Its name is derived from Indian merchants, the banias, who conducted business in its shade. Today, banyan trees remain as meeting places in most villages in India. Although sacred due to its association with gods, people do not sleep under it at night as ghosts and demons are believed to haunt its canopies. The sap, bark, aerial roots and leaves are often used in traditional medicine.

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Horseradish Tree/ Drumstick Tree (Moringa oleifera)

A fast-growing, drought-resistant tree from North India, the horseradish tree is cultivated in many tropical and subtropical areas as an ornamental plant and for its edible leaves, flowers, seeds, pods and seed oil. Its shredded roots, which taste like horseradish, are used as a condiment while its seeds and immature seed pods, called “drumsticks”, are full of vitamins and dietary fibre. Due to its high nutritional content and tolerance to drought, the horseradish tree shows promise as a crop to relieve hunger and malnutrition in some developing countries. 

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Tamarind (Tamarindus indica)

Tamarind is the sausage-shaped seed pod of this large tree from Africa that now grows widely in the tropics, particularly in India. It is commonly used to add a sour flavour to many regional cuisines. Although often grown near Indian temples, people avoid walking or sleeping under a tamarind tree at night as it is believed that ghosts hide in its feathery foliage at that time. As a medicine, it treats a range of conditions from stomach discomfort to sore throat and sunstroke.

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Chinese Garden

Discover a balanced landscape where art imitates nature, with the use of rocks to resemble mountains, water features to resemble rivers and waterfalls, or pruning and training trees to appear windswept.

Open daily: 5.00am - 2.00am

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Bamboo (Bambusa sp.)

Besides being a food source, bamboo has been used for construction and furniture, textile and paper-making, traditional medicine, musical instruments and weapons since time immemorial. It is one of the fastest-growing plants in the world and one of the most versatile too. In China, it represents longevity, simplicity and humility because of its durability, strength and flexibility. The Chinese like to plant and eat bamboo, feature it in their paintings, and write poems about its endurance and about gentlemen who possess the same virtues represented by the plant.

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Tree Jasmine (Mayodendron igneum)

Growing to a height of 20 metres, the tree jasmine can be found on slopes and in forests in Southern China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. Its fragrant, bright orange, tubular flowers grow directly out of its trunk or on old branches, a phenomenon known as ‘cauliflory’. Its seeds are dispersed when each long fruit capsule splits open. In China, its flowers are eaten as vegetables while its bark is used for treating dysentery and diarrhoea.

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Chinese Perfume Plant (Aglaia odorata)

The blooms of this evergreen, aromatic shrub or small tree flowers several times a year. They resemble tiny, yellow balls which do not open up but emit a lovely citrus scent in the evening. In traditional medicine, its flowers, leaves and roots are used as a tonic to relieve rheumatic pains, swelling and superficial infections. The chinese perfume plant has now become a popular houseplant beyond its native range of South China and Indochina.

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Supertree Grove

Home to 12 of the Gardens’ 18 iconic Supertrees as well as the 128m-long OCBC Skyway. Catch the free Garden Rhapsody light-and-sound show nightly.

Opens daily: 5.00am - 2.00am

Free Admission

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Supertrees

One of the iconic features of the Gardens that you should not miss is the unique towering structures known as “Supertrees”. Clad with ferns, orchids, bromeliads, tillandsias and climbers, they are an example of vertical gardening.

Enjoy a bird’s eye view of the Gardens from the 128 metre long OCBC Skyway and revel in a romantic night under the stars at Supertree Grove with a spectacular light and sound show at 7.45pm and 8.45pm every night.

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Supertree Observatory

You can also head up the Supertree Observatory located 50 metres above the ground, at the canopy of the tallest Supertree. There, you can soak in unblocked cityscape views at our open-air rooftop deck, enjoy light refreshments and immerse yourself in digital learning experiences inside our observatory space.