Go to mobile site
Gardens By The Bay / Attractions / Heritage Gardens

Heritage Gardens

Bringing the history of singapore to life through the fascinating story of plants

Learn about Singapore's diverse history and culture, told through the fascinating story of plants in the Heritage Gardens. Walk around the four themed gardens and discover how plants are intricately linked to Singapore's culture.

  • Open daily:

    5.00am - 2.00am 

  • Free admission

Explore Heritage Gardens

Select a garden in Heritage Gardens to explore

Asian Palmyra Palm
Borassus flabellifer
Asian Palmyra Palm
  • The Indians call the Asian Palmyra Palm the ‘celestial tree’ as every part has a use. The nut’s sap can be made into drinks, while the nut can be roasted or germinated and eaten as a vegetable. And the trunk, sheath and leaves can be used as building materials.

Forbidden Fruit of India, or Divi-kaduru
Tabernaemontana dichotoma
Divi-kaduru
  • The Divi-kaduru is valued for its ornamental flowers and fruits. Its bark and roots are used for treating high-blood pressure, pain and inflammation. The soft wood of its trunk are made into masks used for Sri Lankan "low country" dancing, which includes the "Kolam" and "Thovil and Bali" dances.

Banyan Tree
Ficus benghalensis
Banyan Tree
  • The National Tree of India, the Banyan Tree is considered sacred and symbolises eternal life. In Hindu mythology, Lord Shiva is sometimes depicted as sitting in silence under this tree.

Pine
Pinus spp.
Pine
  • A symbol of longevity, persistence, tenacity and dignity, Pine is an everygreen tree that is often found during winter in China. Here at the Chinese Garden, one of the species planted here is the Pinus caribaea, a particular tropical species that can withstand Singapore’s hot and wet climate.

Chinese Pistache
Pistachia chinensis
Chinese Pistache
  • The Chinese Pistache originates from the hills and mountains of Taiwan and China. An extremely bitter medicine can be extracted from a plant parasite that grows from the root of this plant.

King Sago Cycad
Cycas revoluta
King Sago Cycad
  • Don’t be fooled by this gnarled and twisted looking plant. Known as the King Sago Cycad, it is a symbol of longevity. Its starch, similar to that of a palm sago, can be extracted from its pith, but has to be washed several times as other parts of the plant are poisonous.

Bread Fruit Tree
Artocarpus altilis
Bread Fruit Tree
  • Originally from Southeast Asia, this tree is now cultivated in many tropical countries. The fruits on the Bread Fruit Tree can be used as a bread substitute by baking, roasting or boiling its flesh.

Star Fruit
Averrhoa carambola
Star Fruit
  • Originally from Malaysia, today, the Star Fruit is cultivated throughout the tropics. When you slice it, the fruit actually looks like a star and can be eaten fresh or made into jams and preserves. Star Fruit is also known to prevent diabetes and alleviate hypertension.

Tongkat Ali
Eurycoma longifolia
Tongkat Ali
  • Keep an eye out for this infamous plant, often referred to as Malaysia’s homegrown Viagra for its aphrodisiac properties. Originating from Malaysia and Indonesia, the extremely bitter leaves, bark and roots of this plant are also traditionally used for anti-malarial, anti-diabetic and anti-microbial purposes.

Rubber
Hevea brasiliensis
Rubber
  • Rubber originates from the Brazilian Amazon, which used to monopolise the production of rubber. During the colonial days, the British obtained some of its seeds and had the seedlings germinated. They were then sent to Ceylon and Singapore where they were cultivated extensively.

Cocoa
Theobroma cocao
Cocoa
  • Considered by the Aztec and Mayans as a drink for the gods, the Cocoa tree from Central America is still a precious commodity today. This small tree benefits from the shade as it is often grown under the Madre de cacao or Cocoa's mother tree.

Oil Palm
Elaeis guineensis
Oil Palm
  • A native of West Africa, the Oil Palm was brought to Malaysia by the British. The Oil Palm was a substitute for rubber as there was tremendous demand for its cheap saturated oil. Faced with concerns regarding biodiversity loss, Oil Palm is now cultivated in areas of the world which are unrivalled in their plant diversity and also home to animals like the orang utan.

Visit the gardens

18 Marina Gardens Drive
Singapore 018953
Get Directions