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Gardens By The Bay / Attractions / Flower Dome

Flower Dome

Enter a world of perpetual spring, where unique plants bloom

Step into the Flower Dome and stand in awe. Spectacular and innovative, it is the largest glass greenhouse in the world as listed in the 2015 Guinness World Records! Be amazed by changing display of flowers and plants from the Mediterranean and semi-arid regions.

  • Open daily:

    9.00am - 9.00pm
    Last ticket sale: 8.00pm
    Last admission: 8.30pm

  • Indoor temperature Range: 23°C - 25°C

African Baobab
Adansonia digitata
African Baobab
  • The African Baobab, weighing more than 32 tons, is the largest tree in the Flower Dome. Flowering at night, this species is pollinated by fruit bats, while terrestial mammals like baboons and elephants disperse its fruits by passing the seeds through the digestive tract before germination.

Drunken Tree or Palo Borracho
Ceiba chodatii
Drunken Tree or Palo Borracho
  • Related to the Kapok Tree of the Brazilian Amazon and Western Africa, the Drunken Tree's seeds are surrounded by smooth, light fibres that are usually collected to make pillows and cushions. Take a closer look at their amazing round trunks that are used to store water, and their beautiful ivory-coloured flowers, which are pollinated by hawk moths.

Ghost Tree
Moringa douhartii
Ghost Tree
  • Originating from South-western Madagascar, the Ghost Tree is often cultivated at traditional tombs in local villages. Despite being related to the edible Horse Radish Tree from India, its foliage, fruits and seeds are not consumed locally. Some cultures claim to use its aromatic sap as medicine for coughs and colds.

Tree Grape
Cyphostema juttae
Tree Grape
  • The African Baobab, weighing more than 32 tons, is Originating from the arid regions of Nambia, the Tree Grape has a distinctive swollen caudex that functions as a stem and root. As the loss of foliage during draughtc is a common occurrence, the function of leaves and photosynthesis is taken up by the branches which are noticeably green.

Wooly Cactus
Vatricania guentheri
Wooly Cactus
  • A native of the Andes of Bolivia, this cactus has succulent stem, golden spined and a lateral wooly cephalium, which not only protects the flowers against dehydration but also pollinating bats.

Century Plant of Maguey
Agave spp.
Century Plant of Maguey
  • The Maguey with rosette leaves from Mexico and Central America is monocarpic. That means it flowers once and the plant will then die. Some species have spines to protect their juicy leaves from predators, In Mexico, the Blue Agave plant is harvested for tequila, which is distilled from its fermented sap.

Queensland Bottle Tree
Brachychiton rupestris
Queensland Bottle Tree
  • Native to Queensland, this tree has a dramatic tapering trunk, which together with the roots, functions as a water storage organ. The roots provide large quantities of drinking water, while the green stem performs photosynthesis even when the tree loses its leaves. The Aborigines have been known to cut holes in the soft trunks to create artificial reservoirs.

Kangaroo's Paw
Anigozanthos spp.
Kangaroo's Paw
  • Take a close look at this plant and try to see the resemblance of the flower buds to a kangaroo's paw. This unique feature makes it a popular houseplant, resulting in the removal of Kangaroo's Paw from its natural habitat. Normally found in Southwestern Australia, this plant has a root sap that helps it survive extreme dry spells.

Grass Tree
Xanthorrhoea glauca
Grass Tree
  • The Grass Tree grows slowly at about 1 to 2cm a year and has a lifespan of about 600 years. It flowers more prolifically when stimulated by bushfires. Fire helps with leaf removal and produces ethylene gas, which ripens the fruit. The resin was once used by the Aborigines and early European settlers to make glue or varnish.

King Sugar Bush
Protea cynaroides
King Sugar Bush
  • The King Sugar Bush is related to the King Protea or Giant Protea, the national flower of South Africa. Its thick underground stems contain many dormant buds that will produce new growth even after a fire. There are very few left in the wild due to the fragile environment they live in. These days, they are mostly cultivated in greenhouses or nurseries.

Bird of Paradise
Strelitzia reginae
Bird of Paradise
  • With a striking resemblance to a bird with a tuft of orange and blue feathers on its head, the Bird of Paradise has no trunk and forms a clump of leaves up to 2 metres high. A yellow-flowered version, known as ‘Mandela's Gold Strelitzia’, was grown as a homage to the great South African leader.

Aloes
Aloes spp.
Aloes
  • Found in Africa and Madagascar, Aloes have succulent leaves with very thick epidermis and spiny edges that protect a soft, water storing mucilage. Many species are currently endangered through human disturbance to their habitat. Be awed by one of Africa’s tallest species, the Tree Aloe (Aloe barberae) in the South African Garden.

Chilean Wine Palm
Jubaea chilensis
Chilean Wine Palm
  • Once described by Charles Darwin as a ‘very ugly tree’, the Chilean Wine Palm is known as the ‘Incredible Hulk’ due to its massive girth and height. There are multiple uses for different parts of this tree, as the seeds are edible and the leaves can be used to make baskets. This species is considered vulnerable by the IUCN.

Chilean Puya
Puya chilensis
Chilean Puya
  • A native of Central-Eastern Chile, the Chilean Puya is an impressive rosette-forming plant that boasts big blooms with special perches for hummingbirds, the pollinators of its lime-green flowers. In Chile, the young leaves are eaten as a vegetable, and the fibre found in mature leaves is used to make fish-nets.

Monkey Puzzle Tree
Araucaria araucana
Monkey Puzzle Tree
  • The national tree of Chile, the Monkey Puzzle Tree got its name when one of the first people to plant it said, “It would puzzle a monkey to climb that!,” in reference to the tree’s spiny branches. The trunk can reach 2.5 m in diameter, with branches covered by thick, scale-like, prickly leaves. Highly prized for its valuable wood and edible nuts, this species is now considered vulnerable by IUCN.

California lilac
Ceanothus spp.
California lilac
  • This shrub with its small, crenate leaves is related to the Chinese Jujuba Date (Ziziphus jujuba). Its small blue flowers appear in masses for a beautiful visual treat, and it is also a very popular plant with bee-keepers.

Manzanita
Arctostaphylos sp.
Manzanita
  • Related to the edible blueberries, this pretty little shrub grows into a beautiful twisted stem over time, with small white and pink rounded flowers resembling little hanging lanterns. Its fruits are eaten by various animals like raccoons, squirrels and birds and are a valuable source of nutrients during the dry season.

Stone Pine
Pinus pinea
Stone Pine
  • Grown in the Mediterranean for thousands of years, this coniferous species is known for its edible pine nuts that are used in the traditional ‘pesto’ sauce from Italy. It has a characteristic umbrella-like shape, with a short trunk, broad, rounded crown, and attractive reddish bark.

Cork Oak
Quercus suber
Cork Oak
  • The Cork Oak is a fire-resistant evergreen tree with a thick, insulating bark that regenerates after being harvested. It is mainly used as cork wine bottle stoppers and cork flooring. With the arrival of synthetic wine stoppers, it is feared that cork oak landscapes will lose their significance and cease to be conserved.

Dragon Tree
Dracaema draco
Dragon Tree
  • Native to the Canary Islands, Madeira and Cape Verde, this tree has a blood-red sap that was used by natives from the Canary Islands to mummify corpses. In Europe, it was also used as a colorant and anti-oxidant to protect tools.

Olive Tree
Olea europaea
Olive Tree
  • Marvel at the ancient Olive Trees in the Olive Grove. Some of these gnarled and twisted trees, estimated to be over a thousand years old, were moved from Spain, where their orchard was about to undergo development.

Common Fig or Turkish Fig
Ficus carica
Common Fig
  • A native of Southeast Asia, the fig tree has been around for a very long time. It was taken to the Mediterranean before the discovery of the Americas.

Pomegranate Tree
Punica granatum
Pomegranate Tree
  • This native of Iran was brought to Europe by the Arabs and is valued by many cultures for its beauty and uniqueness. The rind of the fruit and the bark of the tree are used as traditional remedies against diarrhoea, dysentery and intestinal parasites.

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18 Marina Gardens Drive
Singapore 018953
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